• Pastor R. Freytag, who was called 1985 to Church of the Cross, was then called to the Church of Christ congregation as well.

  • During the mid 1970’s (in the years of Rev. Horst Gutsche (1976-1978) and Rev. Horst Aechtner (1979-1983), immigration from Germany was practically non-existent. As a result, the congregation became weaker and attendance diminished.

  • During the Pastor Fritz Rehn (1967-1971) & Pastor Dittmar Mündel (1971-1975) years, the congregation grew very rapidly and began to stretch the limits of the new space.

  • The congregation was able to find a better more suitable place for the growing years. Rev. Strothotte, who was the Pastor for Church of Christ at that time, knew of our desire to find a larger church, and his congregation needed financial help for their mortgage. See Church of Christ.

  • In 1968, the congregation had to sell the properties to the City of Vancouver for $58,000 achieving a $22,000 profit. The Synod withdrew support from that point on and the congregation celebrated a mortgage burning event.

  • Rev. Guenter Strothotte (1961-1966) suggested the congregation should buy three revenue properties for $36,000 with the help of the Kirchliche Aussenamt in Germany (who contributed $8,061) to eventually build a bigger church with room for education.

  • The Cross Church moved into their own and renovated church on 8th Avenue & Prince Albert Street.

  • Redeemer Lutheran Church, also a former German speaking congregation, build a new church building on Laurie and Granville Streets and sell the old church to the Church of the Cross for $8,000 despite having higher offers.

  • In 1955, the church joins the United Lutheran Church in America, Pacific Synod. Only then did the congregation receive small monetary support toward a pastor’s salary. The government also granted a Marriage License privilege. Up to that point the minister of the Danish Lutheran Church had to be present at all marriages.

  • Rev. Kurt Marx, a prisoner of War of the USA, came to Canada in 1952. He was a logger and carpenter initially. In October 1953, he sent out letters of invitations to all German immigrants he had addresses for. The invitation was to start a new Lutheran Church in Vancouver. He would be the Pastor and work as carpenter on the side until the congregation could afford to pay him a salary. About 60-70 people became founding members.